Rugby Vitamin D3 Dietary Supplement 125 mcg (5000 IU) - 100 Capsules

Rugby

$7.49

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UPC:
880681131008
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Expiration Date:
12-2024
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Product Overview

Rugby Vitamin D3 Dietary Supplement 125 mcg - 100 Capsules

  • Potency Guaranteed
  • Free Of
    • Yeast
    • Wheat
    • Gluten 
    • Milk or milk derivates
    • Lactose
    • Artificial Color
    • Artificial Flavor
    • Sodium (less than 5 mg per serving)

Supplement Facts 

  • Serving Size (1 Capsule)
  • Vitamin D (as Chloecalciferol)
    • Daily Value: 125 mcg (5000 IU), 625% 

Other Ingredients

  • Starch, Gelatin, Calcium Carbonate, Microcrystalline Cellulose, Sucrose, Croscarmellose Sodium, Stearic Acid, Sodium Ascorbate, Triglycerides, Magnesium Stearate, Acacia, Maltodextrin, Silica, Tocopherols

Directions

  • For Adults
    • Take one (1) capsule daily, preferably with a meal
    • As a reminder, discuss the supplements and medications you take with your health care providers 

Warnings

  • If you are pregnant, nursing, taking any medications or planning any medical procedure, consult your doctor before use
  • Discontinue use and consult your doctor if any adverse reactions occur
  • Not intended for use by persons under the age of 18
  • Keep out of reach of children 

Other Information

  • Store at room temperature and avoid excessive heat
  • Tamper resistant 
  • Do not use if seal under cap is broken or missing

What is vitamin D3 125 mcg 5000 IU good for?

Vitamin D3, also known as cholecalciferol, is a form of vitamin D that is synthesized in the skin when it is exposed to sunlight. It is an essential nutrient that plays a vital role in various bodily functions. The dosage you mentioned, 125 mcg (micrograms) or 5000 IU (International Units), refers to a common supplemental dose of vitamin D3. Here are some of the potential benefits associated with adequate levels of vitamin D3:

1. Bone Health: Vitamin D3 helps regulate calcium and phosphorus absorption, which are crucial for maintaining healthy bones and teeth. It aids in calcium deposition and bone mineralization, thereby reducing the risk of conditions like osteoporosis and fractures.

2. Immune Function: Vitamin D3 is involved in modulating the immune system. It supports immune cell function and helps defend against infections and autoimmune diseases.

3. Mood and Mental Health: Some studies suggest that vitamin D3 may have a positive impact on mood regulation. Low levels of vitamin D have been associated with an increased risk of depression, seasonal affective disorder (SAD), and other mental health conditions.

4. Muscle Strength: Sufficient vitamin D3 levels have been linked to improved muscle strength and function, particularly in older adults. It may help reduce the risk of falls and fractures.

5. Heart Health: Adequate vitamin D3 levels may contribute to cardiovascular health. Some research suggests that it may help regulate blood pressure, reduce inflammation, and improve overall heart function.

6. Cancer Prevention: There is evidence to suggest that maintaining adequate vitamin D3 levels may reduce the risk of certain cancers, including colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer. However, more research is needed to establish a definitive relationship.

It's important to note that while vitamin D3 supplementation can be beneficial for individuals with deficiencies or those at risk of deficiencies (such as people with limited sun exposure or certain medical conditions), it is always recommended to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any supplementation regimen. They can assess your specific needs and guide you on the appropriate dosage and duration of supplementation.

Is 125 mcg of D3 too much?

The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for vitamin D varies depending on age, sex, and other factors. However, many health organizations consider a daily intake of 600-800 IU (15-20 mcg) of vitamin D as adequate for most healthy individuals. The dosage you mentioned, 125 mcg (micrograms) or 5000 IU (International Units) of vitamin D3, exceeds the RDA.

While the dosage of 125 mcg (5000 IU) may be appropriate for certain individuals with specific needs, such as those with documented vitamin D deficiencies, it is generally considered a high dose. It's important to note that excessive vitamin D intake can lead to toxicity, which can cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, weakness, and even kidney damage.

It is always advisable to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any supplementation regimen, especially if you are considering a high-dose vitamin D supplement. They can evaluate your individual circumstances, assess your vitamin D levels through blood tests if necessary, and provide appropriate guidance on dosage and duration of supplementation based on your specific needs.

What happens if I take 5000 IU of vitamin D3 everyday?

Taking 5000 IU (125 mcg) of vitamin D3 daily is considered a high dose, exceeding the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for most individuals. While some people may require higher doses of vitamin D3 due to specific health conditions or deficiencies, it's important to be aware of the potential risks associated with excessive vitamin D intake. Here are some possible consequences:

1. Vitamin D Toxicity: Prolonged high-dose vitamin D supplementation can lead to vitamin D toxicity or hypervitaminosis D. Symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, poor appetite, excessive thirst, frequent urination, constipation, weakness, confusion, and kidney damage. Vitamin D toxicity is rare but can occur with prolonged intake of extremely high doses.

2. Hypercalcemia: Excessive vitamin D can increase the absorption of calcium from the intestines, leading to elevated blood calcium levels (hypercalcemia). Hypercalcemia can cause symptoms such as excessive thirst, frequent urination, abdominal pain, bone pain, muscle weakness, and in severe cases, it can affect the kidneys and cardiovascular system.

3. Calcium Buildup: High levels of vitamin D can also contribute to the buildup of calcium in soft tissues, such as the arteries and kidneys. This can potentially increase the risk of kidney stones and negatively impact cardiovascular health.

4. Interactions and Medication Effects: Vitamin D can interact with certain medications, such as corticosteroids, thiazide diuretics, and some anti-seizure medications. It's important to consult with a healthcare professional to determine if high-dose vitamin D supplementation may interfere with any medications you are taking.

It's essential to note that the risks of vitamin D toxicity are relatively low with daily intakes up to 4000 IU (100 mcg) in most healthy individuals. However, exceeding this dosage without medical supervision may increase the likelihood of adverse effects.

It's strongly recommended to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any high-dose vitamin D supplementation regimen. They can evaluate your specific needs, assess your vitamin D levels, and provide appropriate guidance on dosage and duration to ensure your safety and optimize your health.

How much vitamin D3 125 mcg should I take daily?

The appropriate dosage of vitamin D3 (125 mcg) can vary depending on individual factors such as age, sex, overall health, sun exposure, and existing medical conditions. It is always best to consult with a healthcare professional who can evaluate your specific needs and recommend an appropriate dosage based on your circumstances. They may consider factors such as your current vitamin D levels, any underlying health conditions, and other medications you may be taking.

The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for vitamin D varies by age group, and the values provided below are based on the recommendations for the general population:

1. Infants (0-12 months): The RDA is 400-1,000 IU (10-25 mcg) per day.
2. Children (1-18 years): The RDA is 600-1,000 IU (15-25 mcg) per day.
3. Adults (18-70 years): The RDA is 600-800 IU (15-20 mcg) per day.
4. Adults over 70 years: The RDA is 800-1,000 IU (20-25 mcg) per day.

For individuals who have vitamin D deficiencies or have been advised by a healthcare professional to take higher doses, they may prescribe doses beyond the RDA.

It's important to note that the above recommendations are general guidelines, and individual needs may vary. Working with a healthcare professional will ensure that you receive personalized advice and an appropriate dosage based on your specific circumstances. They can perform blood tests to determine your vitamin D levels and tailor a supplementation plan accordingly.

What are the side effects of taking vitamin D 5000 IU?

When taken within the recommended dosage range, vitamin D supplementation is generally safe for most individuals. However, taking high doses of vitamin D, such as 5000 IU (125 mcg) or more, can potentially lead to certain side effects. Here are some possible side effects associated with excessive vitamin D intake:

1. Vitamin D Toxicity: Prolonged intake of high-dose vitamin D can lead to vitamin D toxicity or hypervitaminosis D. This can result in symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, poor appetite, excessive thirst, frequent urination, constipation, weakness, confusion, and kidney damage. Vitamin D toxicity is rare but can occur with prolonged intake of extremely high doses.

2. Hypercalcemia: Elevated levels of vitamin D can increase the absorption of calcium from the intestines, leading to elevated blood calcium levels (hypercalcemia). Hypercalcemia can cause symptoms such as excessive thirst, frequent urination, abdominal pain, bone pain, muscle weakness, and in severe cases, it can affect the kidneys and cardiovascular system.

3. Calcium Buildup: Excessive vitamin D can contribute to the buildup of calcium in soft tissues, such as the arteries and kidneys. This can potentially increase the risk of kidney stones and negatively impact cardiovascular health.

4. Interactions and Medication Effects: Vitamin D can interact with certain medications, such as corticosteroids, thiazide diuretics, and some anti-seizure medications. Taking high-dose vitamin D without medical supervision may increase the likelihood of adverse interactions with these medications.

It's important to note that the risks of vitamin D toxicity and side effects are relatively low with daily intakes up to 4000 IU (100 mcg) in most healthy individuals. However, it's always recommended to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any high-dose vitamin D supplementation regimen. They can evaluate your specific needs, assess your vitamin D levels, and provide appropriate guidance on dosage and duration to ensure your safety and optimize your health.

Can 5000 IU of vitamin D cause toxicity?

The potential for vitamin D toxicity, also known as hypervitaminosis D, increases with very high doses of vitamin D over an extended period. While the threshold for toxicity can vary among individuals, a daily intake of 5000 IU (125 mcg) of vitamin D is generally considered safe for most adults.

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has set the tolerable upper intake level (UL) for vitamin D at 4000 IU (100 mcg) per day for individuals aged 9 years and older. This means that most people can consume up to 4000 IU daily without an increased risk of adverse effects.

However, it's important to note that individual sensitivity can vary, and some individuals may be more prone to vitamin D toxicity even at lower doses. Factors such as age, underlying health conditions, interactions with medications, and individual differences in metabolism can influence the risk of toxicity.

Symptoms of vitamin D toxicity can include nausea, vomiting, poor appetite, excessive thirst, frequent urination, constipation, weakness, confusion, and kidney damage. Severe cases can lead to hypercalcemia, characterized by elevated blood calcium levels, which can affect various organs and systems in the body.

If you have concerns about vitamin D supplementation or if you're considering high-dose supplementation, it's always best to consult with a healthcare professional. They can evaluate your specific needs, assess your vitamin D levels through blood tests if necessary, and provide personalized guidance on dosage and duration of supplementation to ensure your safety and well-being.